Is It If I Were Or If I Was?

Can you say if I was?

Many people use if I was and if I were interchangeably to describe a hypothetical situation.

The confusion occurs because when writing in the past tense, I was is correct while I were is incorrect.

However, when writing about non-realistic or hypothetical situations, if I were is the only correct choice..

Which is or that is?

The clause that comes after the word “which” or “that” is the determining factor in deciding which one to use. If the clause is absolutely pertinent to the meaning of the sentence, you use “that.” If you could drop the clause and leave the meaning of the sentence intact, use “which.”

Was or were with there?

Answer #1 is correct; use the plural verb, were, because there are multiple toys. In my house, there were many toys. If you were talking about 1 pile of toys though, you would use “was,” the singular verb, because there is 1, single pile. … “There was a pile of toys on the living room floor!”

Which is or where is?

Put simply. If you are focusing on a situation or place use where. If you are making a distinction between two or more things, then use which.

Which which meaning?

The meaning and origin of the expression: Which is which – often expressed as a question, asking for help in distinguishing two similar things or people.

Which is correct grammatically correct if I was or if I were?

“I were” is called the subjunctive mood, and is used when you’re are talking about something that isn’t true or when you wish something was true. If she was feeling sick… <-- It is possible or probable that she was feeling sick. "I was" is for things that could have happened in the past or now.

How do you use have had in one sentence?

We use have had in the present perfect when the main verb is also “have”:I’m not feeling well. I have had a headache all day.She has had three children in the past five years.We have had some problems with our computer systems recently.He has had two surgeries on his back.

Is it grammatically correct to say if I were you?

From my research online the correct way is to say “If I were you” and not “If I was you” because this is the “subjunctive mood”. However they don’t say the underlying reason for it. They just say use “If I were you” when it is subjunctive.

When to use were instead of was?

Was is used in the first and third person singular past. It is used for statements of fact. Were is used in the second person singular and plural and first and third person plural. It is used in the subjunctive mood to indicate unreal or hypothetical statements.

Is if she were correct grammar?

“If she was” is past tense, indicative mood. It describes something that happened or may have happened in the past. … “If she were” is present tense, subjunctive mood. It describes a hypothetical situation that is not true.

Who is VS that is?

When you are determining whether you should use who or that, keep these simple guidelines in mind: Who is always used to refer to people. That is always used when you are talking about an object. That can also be used when you are talking about a class or type of person, such as a team.

Why do we say if I were?

The reason we use WERE instead of WAS is because the sentence is in the SUBJUNCTIVE mood which is used for hypothetical situations. This is a condition which is contrary to fact or reality (the fact is, I am NOT you). In the subjunctive mood we use IF + I / HE / SHE / IT + WERE for the verb To Be.

Which used in grammar?

In non-defining clauses, use which. Remember, which is as disposable as a sandwich bag. If you can remove the clause without destroying the meaning of the sentence, the clause is nonessential and you can use which.

Is it if I were there or if I was there?

A good trick to decide which you want to use is to determine if the thing you are talking about is something that actually happened or something that you are wishing or imagining might have happened. If it really happened, use “if I was,” but if not, go with “if I were.”

Should you vs IF YOU?

According to Cambridge English Grammar Today, in formal English, you can use should + subject + verb instead of ‘if’. For example: Should you cancel your order, contact our customer services department.