Quick Answer: Was And Has Been In Same Sentence?

When to use has had together in a sentence?

In the present perfect, the auxiliary verb is always have (for I, you, we, they) or has (for he, she, it).

In the past perfect, the auxiliary verb is always had.

We use have had in the present perfect when the main verb is also “have”: I’m not feeling well..

Can you use two different tenses in the same sentence?

Takeaway: The tenses of verbs in a sentence must be consistent when the actions happen at the same time. When dealing with actions that occur at different points in time, however, we can – and probably should – use multiple tenses in the same sentence.

How do you say the word were?

Pronunciation: Were rhymes with purr, stir, and her. Meaning – Were is the past tense of the verb are. Look at this example of were used in a sentence. Since were means the same as the past tense of are in this sentence, it is the correct word to use.

Can you switch tenses in a story?

Generally, writers maintain one tense for the main discourse and indicate changes in time frame by changing tense relative to that primary tense, which is usually either simple past or simple present. Even apparently non-narrative writing should employ verb tenses consistently and clearly.

Can you use has been in a sentence?

Before we talk about the uses, you need to know the basics of where to use have, has and had been: in the present, if the subject of a sentence is I/You/We/They or a plural noun, then we use ‘have been’. If the subject is He/She/It or a singular noun, then we use ‘has been’. This is when we talk about the present.

What’s the difference between where and were?

Were is the past tense of be when used as a verb. Where means in a specific place when used as an adverb or conjunction. A good way to remember the difference is that where has an “h” for “home”, and home is a place. … Were is one of the past tense forms of the verb be.

Which where is were?

Just remember that “we’re” is a contraction (the apostrophe is a giveaway), while “where” is a location, “were” is the past of “to be” (in some cases), and “wear” covers everything else (sometimes literally).

Has been or had been?

“Had been” is used to mean that something happened in the past and has already ended. “Have been” and “has been” are used to mean that something began in the past and has lasted into the present time.

Can you use past and present tense in one sentence?

It’s fine to use the present and the past here. After all, that’s what happens: as you say, you paid the deposit in the past and pay the rent in the present. Tenses should agree in the same clause, but it’s very common to have multiple tenses in the same sentence. Although I was sick yesterday, I am fine today.

Can we use two future tense in a sentence?

The use of double future tense in a single sentence is wrong. … However, my resident expert gave this example: “I will if you will.” This is a conditional sentence in which both clauses, the main clause and the dependent (“if,” conditional) clause, are in future tense. “If you go, I go.” Both simple present.

When to use was and were in a sentence?

Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects. So, you will use “was” with I, he, she and it while you will use “were” with you, we and they. There is a tip you might want to consider. Even though you are singular, you must use “were”.

Was and were in same sentence?

As I said above, was and were are in the past tense, but they are used differently. Was is used in the first person singular (I) and the third person singular (he, she, it). Were is used in the second person singular and plural (you, your, yours) and first and third person plural (we, they). I was driving to the park.

Where do we use had?

When you need to talk about two things that happened in the past and one event started and finished before the other one started, place “had” before the main verb for the event that happened first. Here are some more examples of when to use “had” in a sentence: “Chloe had walked the dog before he fell asleep.”

Has been or had been examples?

For example, if I started studying art when I was 13 years old and I am still studying art, I would say “I have been studying art since I was 13 years old.” “Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural.